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Hiya Roboteers, welcome to Joe's Giant Robots! Here you’ll find a hodgepodge of pop culture oddities, vintage bric-a-brac, and anything I may fancy. My posts aren't politically correct at times, so if you’re easily offended you’ve been warned. Please feel free to poke around and have fun at my little internet-clubhouse. And as always gang, enjoy! ~Joe

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1965 – Unknown Robot – (Hungarian)
Here’s a quote from where I found this awesome Hungarian Robot:

I first saw this robot on the cover of Tihamér Nemes book on Cybernetic Machines (German edition 1967). I assumed it to be a toy. It wasn’t until I found the video clip that I realized it was a full-size humanoid. Other than that, I know little about this robot. 
The robot uses a gliding walk on wheels. The heavy batteries are in each foot. The head antenna rotates as does colour filters in front of the eyes. The arms can move up or down in unison. There is a remote hand controller connected by a cable.
The video clip is found here. You will need to register first (for free), then login. Search for “1965 4 11 NU” including the quotation marks. The clip is titled ” UN ROBOT”.  The video clip is dated January 1965, so robot could have been built in 1964 or earlier.

~Joe

1965 – Unknown Robot – (Hungarian)

Here’s a quote from where I found this awesome Hungarian Robot:

I first saw this robot on the cover of Tihamér Nemes book on Cybernetic Machines (German edition 1967). I assumed it to be a toy. It wasn’t until I found the video clip that I realized it was a full-size humanoid. Other than that, I know little about this robot. 

The robot uses a gliding walk on wheels. The heavy batteries are in each foot. The head antenna rotates as does colour filters in front of the eyes. The arms can move up or down in unison. There is a remote hand controller connected by a cable.

The video clip is found here. You will need to register first (for free), then login. Search for “1965 4 11 NU” including the quotation marks. The clip is titled ” UN ROBOT”.  The video clip is dated January 1965, so robot could have been built in 1964 or earlier.

~Joe

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Walking Robot Has Radio Controls (Oct, 1948)
Found on Modern Mechanix - Here’s a quote:

Walking Robot Has Radio Controls
Controlled by a radio installed in a truck, a 400-pound robot can walk under its own power. The mechanical man, built by Reat Younger of Springfield, Mo., stands over six feet tall and weighs 400 pounds. Younger was intrigued by a robot he saw in a motion picture when he was a boy, and started building his own automaton while he was in high school. He now is working on plans to make the robot walk through a complicated system of transmitters, receivers and relays.

Enjoy, gang
~Joe

Walking Robot Has Radio Controls (Oct, 1948)

Found on Modern Mechanix - Here’s a quote:

Walking Robot Has Radio Controls

Controlled by a radio installed in a truck, a 400-pound robot can walk under its own power. The mechanical man, built by Reat Younger of Springfield, Mo., stands over six feet tall and weighs 400 pounds. Younger was intrigued by a robot he saw in a motion picture when he was a boy, and started building his own automaton while he was in high school. He now is working on plans to make the robot walk through a complicated system of transmitters, receivers and relays.

Enjoy, gang

~Joe

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I Was a Teenage Werewolf (1957)

Here is a nice collection of images from  I Was A Teenage Werewolf that I found from various places online. Credit goes to all the original sources. This awesomeness is from the 1957 movie, I Was a Teenage Werewolf, starring Michael Landon as THE teenage werewolf! This is the real “stuff”!

In 1985 Michael J. Fox made a very fun and very awesome “remake” of sorts with his fantasy comedy film, Teen Wolf.

As always Roboteers, please do enjoy!

~Joe

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JGR Freaky Friday: Ernest Chiriacka 1954 Esquire Calendar!

Ten months of Ernest Chiriacka's 1954 Esquire Calendar. At the time of this post I couldn't locate decent size images for May and July that's why they are missing from the above images. The quality-control part of me just could not post sub-quality small size version, however, the meticulous and anal completest in me wants to post all twelve months.

Both parts of myself were able to come to a compromise; to post the ten large size images as a photo set and then tack on the two small sized missing months as an inline image in this text area.

Here are the missing small images May:
Ernest Chiriacka calendar - May 1954

And here’s July:
Ernest Chiriacka calendar - July 1954

Don’t know who this incredible pulp/pin-up artist was? Read up on Ernest Chiriacka here!

As always Roboteers, please enjoy!

It’s time to get freaky, see my other questionable Freaky Friday posts here.

~Joe

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ERIC ROBOT HAS PUMP FOR HEART (May, 1929)
Here’s a quote from the original source, Modern Mechanix:

ERIC ROBOT HAS PUMP FOR HEART
ERIC ROBOT, London’s famous mechanical man, opened his heart to the public the other day to show just what was in him. As the photograph shows, Eric’s “in-sides” are so mechanically complicated that a physician called upon to operate on him for appendicitis would hardly know where to begin. The two bellows which may be seen in the picture represent Eric’s lungs, and the small furnace is his stomach. The pumping machine does duty as his heart, being connected up with various portions of his person by means of hollow tubing.

As always gang, enjoy!
~Joe

ERIC ROBOT HAS PUMP FOR HEART (May, 1929)

Here’s a quote from the original source, Modern Mechanix:

ERIC ROBOT HAS PUMP FOR HEART

ERIC ROBOT, London’s famous mechanical man, opened his heart to the public the other day to show just what was in him. As the photograph shows, Eric’s “in-sides” are so mechanically complicated that a physician called upon to operate on him for appendicitis would hardly know where to begin. The two bellows which may be seen in the picture represent Eric’s lungs, and the small furnace is his stomach. The pumping machine does duty as his heart, being connected up with various portions of his person by means of hollow tubing.

As always gang, enjoy!

~Joe

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Ad: Big “doings” in metal (Jun, 1953)

Big “doings” in metal Here are jusf four outstanding achievements of Lycoming’s precision production … samples that indicate how Lycoming solves metal-working problems for America’s industrial leaders and the Armed Forces.
Even these few samples demonstrate that Lycoming has the machines you can use–the skilled craftsmen you can use … the immense facilities you can use … the creative thinking you can use! For a more complete story on Lycoming, write for the illustrated booklet, “Let’s look at Lycoming.”
LYCOMING AIR-COOLED ENGINES FOR AIRCRAFT AND INDUSTRIAL USES • PRECISION-AND-VOLUME MACHINE PARTS • GRAY-IRON CASTINGS • STEEL-PLATE FABRICATION

From Modern Mechanix.
~Joe

Ad: Big “doings” in metal (Jun, 1953)

Big “doings” in metal

Here are jusf four outstanding achievements of Lycoming’s precision production … samples that indicate how Lycoming solves metal-working problems for America’s industrial leaders and the Armed Forces.

Even these few samples demonstrate that Lycoming has the machines you can use–the skilled craftsmen you can use … the immense facilities you can use … the creative thinking you can use! For a more complete story on Lycoming, write for the illustrated booklet, “Let’s look at Lycoming.”

LYCOMING
AIR-COOLED ENGINES FOR AIRCRAFT AND INDUSTRIAL USES • PRECISION-AND-VOLUME MACHINE PARTS • GRAY-IRON CASTINGS • STEEL-PLATE FABRICATION

From Modern Mechanix.

~Joe

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Weird-Ohs Car-Icky-Tures Plastic Models

Jumpin’ Jupiter Buckaroos, following up on my reblog of Weird-Ohs box art (seen here), here is an original post on the Weird-Ohs! I spared no expense for my faithful Roboteers and I SCOURED the internaught looking for Weird-Ohs photos… so here you go!

Again, these aren’t my model cars NOR my photos I found ‘em online for your enjoyment, so enoy already, gang!

Here’s info on these wonderfully weird models, from the Wiki:

Weird-Ohs

One of Hawk’s best selling kit lines was the “Weird-ohs Car-icky-tures”, dragster and hot rod caricatures (along with the related “Frantics”, and “Silly Surfers" series), based on concepts and art created by their oft-used freelance illustrator Bill Campbell.[9]

Weird-ohs characters:

  • Daddy - The Way Out Suburbanite (racer; aka. “the Swingin’ Suburbanite”)
  • Davey - The Way Out Cyclist (outlaw motorcycle club rider: "He’s a Psycho cyclist! This cat’s a terror on the road …")
  • Digger - The Dragster (racer)
  • Drag Hag - The Bonny, Blastin’ Babe (racer)
  • Endsville Eddie - The Shortstop Stupe (racer)
  • Freddy Flameout - The Way Out Jet Jockey (test pilot)
  • Huey’s Hut Rod - The Way Outhouse Bomb (racer)
  • Sling Rave Curvette - The Way Out Spectator (race fan)
  • Wade A. Minut* - The Wild Starter (race ‘official’; aka. The Timeless Timekeeper)
  • Francis the Foul - The Way Out Dribbler (basketball player)
  • Killer McBash - The Dazzling Decimator (football player)
  • Leaky Boat Louie - The Vulgar Boatman (motorboater)

~Joe

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Weird-Ohs Car-Icky-Tures

Woofelnerts gang, here is some really cool box artwork! Please do enjoy, gang!

Here’s a quote from where I’ve reblogged this from, humungus:

Weird-Ohs Car-Icky-Tures, Plastic Model Kits Box Art

~Joe

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George Ludway, ADAM Magazine

The saucy humor and curvy, well “put together” gals of George Ludway. As Shane Glines says in the quote below about George, he’s pretty fantastic! I found this awesomeness on cartoonretro!

Here’s a quote from Shane Glines about George Ludway:

The great, unknown Ludway. Sexy curves, appealing proportions and great flowy brush lines. Like Bob Tupper he spent the bulk of his career hacking for the Sex to Sexty mags, but at his best in the early 1960’s, he’s pretty fantastic.

It’s time to get freaky, see my other questionable Freaky Friday posts here.

~Joe

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Topps bubblegum trading cards, Batman by Norman Saunders

Norman Saunders (of Topps Mars Attacks trading cards fame) is one of my favorite pulp magazine artists. He was quite prolific in his career painting a “…total of 867 [pulp magazine covers], which is the highest number of covers painted by any pulp artist.”

I found this spiffy cards here!

About the cards:

At the height of the hoopla over ABC-TV’s campy Batman series, Saunders was hired by Topps to produce a line of bubblegum trading cards that depicted the Caped Crusader and Robin, the Boy Wonder, in dozens of precarious situations facing such familiar villains as the Joker and Catwoman.


Partial Quote about the artist, written by his son David:

After two years of unsuccesful attempts to work within the confines of post-war slick magazines, Saunders left the slicks and returned to working for pulp magazines, where he was in constant demand for the remaining years of that industry. During this period he added another 421 pulp covers to his lifetime total of 867, which is the highest number of covers painted by any pulp artist.

He painted his last pulp cover in 1960. Saunders found all of his subsequent clients in the subculture publishing world of paperbacks, comic books, men’s adventure magazines, and trading cards.

Norman Saunders lived long enough to see himself celebrated as the legendary creator of many iconic images of American popular culture.

He retired to his wife’s hometown and died of emphysema at age 82 in Columbus Nebraska on March 7, 1989.

Read the full article here - and as always Roboteers, enjoy!

~Joe