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Hiya Roboteers, welcome to Joe's Giant Robots! Here you’ll find a hodgepodge of pop culture oddities, vintage bric-a-brac, and anything I may fancy. My posts aren't politically correct at times, so if you’re easily offended you’ve been warned. Please feel free to poke around and have fun at my little internet-clubhouse. And as always gang, enjoy! ~Joe

Video

Oscar Mayer Wiener 1965 Commercial

A big fat meaty “wiener thanks” to my good pal Ben (@bstt) for bringing this to my attention and reminding me about this classic American TV commercial.

About Oscar Meyer:

The Oscar Mayer Company is an American meat and cold cut production company, owned by Kraft Foods, known for its hot dogs, bologna, bacon, ham and Lunchables products.

and

Oscar Mayer had several advertisements on TV involving young children, including the Oscar Mayer Wiener ad in 1965. The commercial shows a young girl leading a group of children, singing about what they’d get if they “were an Oscar Mayer wiener”.

~Joe

Photoset

Little Annie Fanny (March 1966)

Here’s a complete Little Annie Fanny story from March 1966.

Here’s a quote from Stephen Worth of Animation Resources where I got these images from:

The “Little Annie Fanny” series debuted in the October 1962 issue of Playboy magazine. The comic was a parody of the Playboy image itself, vaguely based on the “Little Orphan Annie” theme, with lots of topical references and pokes at popular culture. The strip was the first fully painted comic in American magazines, and was very time consuming to produce. Kurtzman continued the series until 1988- its 100th episode- when he retired it, stating that all of the possible story ideas for the character had been exhausted.

See the complete article here.

~Joe

Photoset

Little Annie Fanny (April 1964)

Here’s a complete Little Annie Fanny story from April 1964.

Here’s a quote from Stephen Worth of Animation Resources where I got these images from:

The “Little Annie Fanny” series debuted in the October 1962 issue of Playboy magazine. The comic was a parody of the Playboy image itself, vaguely based on the “Little Orphan Annie” theme, with lots of topical references and pokes at popular culture. The strip was the first fully painted comic in American magazines, and was very time consuming to produce. Kurtzman continued the series until 1988- its 100th episode- when he retired it, stating that all of the possible story ideas for the character had been exhausted.

See the complete article here.

~Joe

Photoset

Little Annie Fanny (January 1963)

Here’s a complete Little Annie Fanny story from January 1963.

Here’s a quote from Stephen Worth of Animation Resources where I got these images from:

The “Little Annie Fanny” series debuted in the October 1962 issue of Playboy magazine. The comic was a parody of the Playboy image itself, vaguely based on the “Little Orphan Annie” theme, with lots of topical references and pokes at popular culture. The strip was the first fully painted comic in American magazines, and was very time consuming to produce. Kurtzman continued the series until 1988- its 100th episode- when he retired it, stating that all of the possible story ideas for the character had been exhausted.

See the complete article here.

~Joe

Photoset

Supercar Gold Key Comic Book Covers

About the comics:

Supercar was the first Gerry Anderson series to be adapted as a comic book in America, with the Gold Key company releasing four issues between November 1962 and August 1963.[1]

~Joe

Photoset

Weird-Ohs Car-Icky-Tures Plastic Models

Jumpin’ Jupiter Buckaroos, following up on my reblog of Weird-Ohs box art (seen here), here is an original post on the Weird-Ohs! I spared no expense for my faithful Roboteers and I SCOURED the internaught looking for Weird-Ohs photos… so here you go!

Again, these aren’t my model cars NOR my photos I found ‘em online for your enjoyment, so enoy already, gang!

Here’s info on these wonderfully weird models, from the Wiki:

Weird-Ohs

One of Hawk’s best selling kit lines was the “Weird-ohs Car-icky-tures”, dragster and hot rod caricatures (along with the related “Frantics”, and “Silly Surfers" series), based on concepts and art created by their oft-used freelance illustrator Bill Campbell.[9]

Weird-ohs characters:

  • Daddy - The Way Out Suburbanite (racer; aka. “the Swingin’ Suburbanite”)
  • Davey - The Way Out Cyclist (outlaw motorcycle club rider: "He’s a Psycho cyclist! This cat’s a terror on the road …")
  • Digger - The Dragster (racer)
  • Drag Hag - The Bonny, Blastin’ Babe (racer)
  • Endsville Eddie - The Shortstop Stupe (racer)
  • Freddy Flameout - The Way Out Jet Jockey (test pilot)
  • Huey’s Hut Rod - The Way Outhouse Bomb (racer)
  • Sling Rave Curvette - The Way Out Spectator (race fan)
  • Wade A. Minut* - The Wild Starter (race ‘official’; aka. The Timeless Timekeeper)
  • Francis the Foul - The Way Out Dribbler (basketball player)
  • Killer McBash - The Dazzling Decimator (football player)
  • Leaky Boat Louie - The Vulgar Boatman (motorboater)

~Joe

Photoset

Topps bubblegum trading cards, Batman by Norman Saunders

Norman Saunders (of Topps Mars Attacks trading cards fame) is one of my favorite pulp magazine artists. He was quite prolific in his career painting a “…total of 867 [pulp magazine covers], which is the highest number of covers painted by any pulp artist.”

I found this spiffy cards here!

About the cards:

At the height of the hoopla over ABC-TV’s campy Batman series, Saunders was hired by Topps to produce a line of bubblegum trading cards that depicted the Caped Crusader and Robin, the Boy Wonder, in dozens of precarious situations facing such familiar villains as the Joker and Catwoman.


Partial Quote about the artist, written by his son David:

After two years of unsuccesful attempts to work within the confines of post-war slick magazines, Saunders left the slicks and returned to working for pulp magazines, where he was in constant demand for the remaining years of that industry. During this period he added another 421 pulp covers to his lifetime total of 867, which is the highest number of covers painted by any pulp artist.

He painted his last pulp cover in 1960. Saunders found all of his subsequent clients in the subculture publishing world of paperbacks, comic books, men’s adventure magazines, and trading cards.

Norman Saunders lived long enough to see himself celebrated as the legendary creator of many iconic images of American popular culture.

He retired to his wife’s hometown and died of emphysema at age 82 in Columbus Nebraska on March 7, 1989.

Read the full article here - and as always Roboteers, enjoy!

~Joe

Video

The Super Chicken Cartoon Theme Song (1967)

The incredible Jay Ward’s Super Chicken!!

When you find yourself in danger,
When you’re threatened by a stranger,
When it looks like you will take a lickin’, (puk, puk, puk)
There is someone waiting,
Who will hurry up and rescue you,
Just Call for Super Chicken! (puk, ack!)

Fred, if you’re afraid you’ll have to overlook it,
Besides you knew the job was dangerous when you took it (puk, ack!)

He will drink his super sauce
And throw the bad guys for a loss
And he will bring them in alive and kickin’ (puk, puk, puk)
There is one thing you should learn
When there is no one else to turn to
Call for Super Chicken! (puk, puk, puk)
Call for Super Chicken! (puk, ack!)

~Joe

Video

George of the Jungle End Theme Song (1967)

The incredible Jay Ward’s George of the Jungle circa 1967!!

~Joe

Photoset

Vic Prezio’s Orignal Cover Art for Magnus, Robot Fighter #21 (February 1968)

Woofleberries robot fighters, here’s part two of today’s awesome Vic Prezio’s Magnus, Robot Fighter cover paintings! Important to note, all the interior artwork for the Gold Key Magnus, Robot Fighter comic book series was illustrated by the legend, Russ Manning!!

Here is a comparison that shows both Vic Prezio’s original painting along side of the final printed cover for Magnus, Robot Fighter #21 (February 1968)!

I found this awesomeballs painted cover artwork on Blogger HERE! A big manly Magnus style karate-chop mega thanks goes to Smeghead2068 for originally posting this awesomeness!

Here’s info on that actual issue on the Grand Comics Database!!

As always Roboteers, ENJOY!!

~Joe